Airleds - Feed https://airleds.com/blogs/feed My awesome blog 2019-11-04T08:57:43Z Zatarain’s Parmesan Garlic Rice with White Beans, Chicken and Spinach https://airleds.com//blogs/feed/zatarain-s-parmesan-garlic-rice-with-white-beans-chicken-and-spinach 2019-11-04T08:57:43Z Airleds Admin I was given complimentary products for testing/tasting purposes by Zatarain's, but all opinions are my own.   Zatarain's automatically brings to mind New Orleans, so to set the mood for a fun and delicious New Orleans meal, a Saints table setting was in order! Zatarains has been a New Orleans tradition since 1889.  We're all familiar with their jambalaya, gumbo, and dirty rice mixes.  Those have been a staple in my pantry for years.  Recently, Zatarain's began offering a new line of mixes which are sure to become favorites of your family as well.    The new Garden District Kitchen Brown Rice and Bean Mixes pays tribute to New Orleans' Italian heritage by combining rich, nutty Parmesan, garlic, and black pepper with whole grain brown rice, white beans, and kale.  Zatarain's provided a recipe to try with this product which adds white meat chicken and spinach which resulted in a VERY easy and fast meal.  Perfect for busy weeknights when you need a healthy dinner on the table in a hurry. As an added bonus, everything cooks in one skillet so cleanup was no problem. 1 T. butter 1/2 lb. boneless skinless chicken breasts cut into thin strips 1 package Zatarain's Parmesan Garlic Brown Rice with White Beans 1 1/2 cups water 1 cup baby spinach leaves Melt butter in medium skillet on medium-high heat.  Add chicken, cook and stir 5 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink.  Remove from skillet and set aside. Stir Rice Mix and water into skillet.  Bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 10 minutes or until rice is tender and most of the water is absorbed. Return chicken to skillet and stir in spinach.  Cover.  Remove from heat.  Let stand 5 minutes.  Garnish with grated Parmesan, if desired. My opinion?  This product lives up to Zatarain's reputation for quality and flavor.  It was very easy to prepare and delivered big time on taste.  I like that the new products include brown rice and white beans.   I believe the new products will become family favorites. #zatarains DISCLAIMER:1.  Terms of Use:  This website provides recipes, food photos, and interesting written content.  I am not a nutritionist and have no expert knowledge of the topic.  Any information provided on or taken from this website is for your enjoyment. So, please take some time and enjoy!2.  Copyright Policy:  Please free to share photos and recipes so long as full credit is given to this blog.  Just give me a should out when you share on your own social media sites, please. 3.  Advertisers, Sponsors & Affiliate Links:  Occasionally there may be ads on this site along with sponsorship, affiliate links, and other items that may compensate the owner of this site.  So if you click on those ads and links, you will be taken to a separate site.  This website is not responsible for anything found on those websites.  Any dispute arising out of a third-party advertiser or affiliate link must be handled through them. About those affiliate links, if you click it and make a purchase, the owner of this website will get some cash money.  How much?  It varies.  You may see a few sponsored posts on this website.  This website will inform you if a post is sponsored and will give you honest reviews.4.  Comments:  I love hearing from readers and provide a space for comments.  All comments are subject to review before approval.5.  Nutritional Information:  As mentioned above, I am NOT a nutritionist.  Under no circumstances will fleurdelolly.blogspot.com be responsible for any loss or damage resulting from your reliance on the nutritional information or lack thereof.
I was given complimentary products for testing/tasting purposes by Zatarain'sbut all opinions are my own.
 
Zatarain's automatically brings to mind New Orleans, so to set the mood for a fun and delicious New Orleans meal, a Saints table setting was in order!

Zatarains has been a New Orleans tradition since 1889.  We're all familiar with their jambalaya, gumbo, and dirty rice mixes.  Those have been a staple in my pantry for years.  Recently, Zatarain's began offering a new line of mixes which are sure to become favorites of your family as well. 
 
The new Garden District Kitchen Brown Rice and Bean Mixes pays tribute to New Orleans' Italian heritage by combining rich, nutty Parmesan, garlic, and black pepper with whole grain brown rice, white beans, and kale. 
Zatarain's provided a recipe to try with this product which adds white meat chicken and spinach which resulted in a VERY easy and fast meal.  Perfect for busy weeknights when you need a healthy dinner on the table in a hurry. As an added bonus, everything cooks in one skillet so cleanup was no problem.
1 T. butter
1/2 lb. boneless skinless chicken breasts cut into thin strips
1 package Zatarain's Parmesan Garlic Brown Rice with White Beans
1 1/2 cups water
1 cup baby spinach leaves
Melt butter in medium skillet on medium-high heat.  Add chicken, cook and stir 5 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink.  Remove from skillet and set aside.
Stir Rice Mix and water into skillet.  Bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 10 minutes or until rice is tender and most of the water is absorbed.
Return chicken to skillet and stir in spinach.  Cover.  Remove from heat.  Let stand 5 minutes.  Garnish with grated Parmesan, if desired.


My opinion?  This product lives up to Zatarain's reputation for quality and flavor.  It was very easy to prepare and delivered big time on taste.  I like that the new products include brown rice and white beans.   I believe the new products will become family favorites.


#zatarains

DISCLAIMER:

1.  Terms of Use:  This website provides recipes, food photos, and interesting written content.  I am not a nutritionist and have no expert knowledge of the topic.  Any information provided on or taken from this website is for your enjoyment. So, please take some time and enjoy!

2.  Copyright Policy:  Please free to share photos and recipes so long as full credit is given to this blog.  Just give me a should out when you share on your own social media sites, please.

3.  Advertisers, Sponsors & Affiliate Links:  Occasionally there may be ads on this site along with sponsorship, affiliate links, and other items that may compensate the owner of this site.  So if you click on those ads and links, you will be taken to a separate site.  This website is not responsible for anything found on those websites.  Any dispute arising out of a third-party advertiser or affiliate link must be handled through them. About those affiliate links, if you click it and make a purchase, the owner of this website will get some cash money.  How much?  It varies.  You may see a few sponsored posts on this website.  This website will inform you if a post is sponsored and will give you honest reviews.

4.  Comments:  I love hearing from readers and provide a space for comments.  All comments are subject to review before approval.

5.  Nutritional Information:  As mentioned above, I am NOT a nutritionist.  Under no circumstances will fleurdelolly.blogspot.com be responsible for any loss or damage resulting from your reliance on the nutritional information or lack thereof.
]]>
Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls https://airleds.com//blogs/feed/chicken-butternut-squash-harvest-bowls 2019-11-04T08:48:36Z Airleds Admin These Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls with brussels sprouts, sage & wild rice are a delicious lunch or dinner idea cooked on a sheet pan and filled with fall flavours! Jump to Recipe Ingredients in harvest bowls Oh hi there fall lunches. These Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls are basically my favourite season made all in one on a sheet pan. It's lunch, it's dinner – really, whatever you decide. And the trick? Lots of garlic and sage! Aka my two favourite fall flavours. Okay, scratch that. Garlic is a favourite seasoning of mine year round. But especially during the fall months. I think it just makes everything better – when in doubt, just add more garlic! (and maybe make sure you don't have a date or important engagement immediately after…?) FREE MEAL PREP CHALLENGE! Subscribe for my free 5-day meal prep challenge complete with printable PDF resources! Your name: Your email: How to make sheet pan chicken I don't know if you've noticed but I've been on a real squash and sweet potato kick lately. They're basically my go-to starches when the weather gets colder, and it helps that they're in season and super cheap at the grocery store. Now I've gotta confess, but these Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls are very similar to this Sheet Pan Honey Dijon Chicken. It's got a similar marinade AND butternut squash, but I promise these bowls are very different in the remaining seasonings. And you know that that's what makes a great recipe right? The ability to make different variations of it over time? I think the fact that it's still in my recipe rotation speaks wonders considering how many different things I end up making on a regular basis. How to cook wild rice Ingredient substitutions I also included some wild rice in these bowls just to keep it all fall-like, but you could do whatever grain you're feeling. I know wild rice tends to take extra time to cook and it'll actually take longer than the veggies and chicken itself so you may want to sub in some quinoa or just add some extra butternut squash or even sweet potatoes to the sheet pan as opposed to doing the extra grain on the side. I've actually found myself eating a lot less grains and way more veggies these days – I just get too full with too many carbs and I'm able to retain more energy throughout the day with just protein, fruits and veggies alone so you may want to follow in my footsteps and do the same here to save time. Storing and reheating Freezing the chicken and rice However, if you really do want the rice, I would highly suggest buying a rice cooker! And no, I'm not going to sell you on one in particular because I haven't quite gotten that far in my research, I'm just recommending it solely on the fact that it makes a lot of my meal prep easier when I am adding grains to things. Rice cookers can cook quinoa, couscous and other grains so all you really need to do is add the correct ratio of grains to water and the rice cooker intuitively cooks until finished. I can't tell you how many times I made rice on the stovetop only to find it sticking to the bottom or that I wasn't cooking it enough. Such a simple thing is much harder than it looks, I swear LOL. With my rice cooker I just set it and forget it, no draining, no under-doneness, nothing. Like I've said time and time again, meal prep is all about making your life easier and there's no way I'm giving myself extra clean up. Sheet pan chicken marinade Speaking of too little time, that's why you need to start prepping more sheet pan meals that turn into meal prep bowls for the week. Meal prep is fun because you can literally take any type of cuisine and turn it into your lunches for the week. Obviously these Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls have a fall theme and are kind of a spin in buddha bowls, but they're also great because you can use up any veggies you have on hand in the fridge, as is the case with most of my recipes. Even if you don't have fresh sage, any combo of herbs and spices will work as long as you add salt, pepper and garlic. And my secret weapon that brightens up just about any sheet pan meal? Lemon juice! Adding a little bit of acid in there with the other herbs and spices can brighten up a meal like no other, and it's a low-calorie way to add a tiny bit more flavour without resorting to processed sauces, etc. More sheet pan chicken recipes Meal prep tools for this recipe Grab some glass meal prep bowls if you plan on turning this recipe into your weekly lunches. I get all my free-range chicken from Butcher Box, conveniently delivered to me frozen. This is the wild rice blend I use Meal prep challenge If you'd like some more help with meal planning, then you'll love my free 5-day meal prep challenge! It's basically a free course that will teach you how to meal prep and cook healthy meals at home with some PDF bonus materials. Sign up for free below: FREE MEAL PREP CHALLENGE! Subscribe for my free 5-day meal prep challenge complete with printable PDF resources! Your name: Your email:   Chicken & Butternut Squash Buddha Meal Prep Bowls These Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls with brussels sprouts, sage & wild rice are a delicious lunch or dinner idea cooked on a sheet pan and filled with fall flavours!  1 tbsp olive oil 1 lb chicken breasts (diced) 1/4 cup honey mustard 1 cup butternut squash, diced 1 cup brussels sprouts, sliced in half 1 red pepper, chopped 1 small red onion, chopped 4 cloves garlic minced 12 fresh sage leaves, finely chopped (alternative: 1 tsp dried) 1 tsp salt 1/2 tsp pepper Wild rice 1 cup wild rice 1 3/4 cups water 1 tsp butter Preheat oven to 450 F. Cook wild rice according to package directions on stove top or in a rice cooker (highly recommend a rice cooker so you can set it and forget it!) Toss chicken with honey mustard. Add all veggies to baking sheet, tossing with olive oil, garlic, sage and salt & pepper. Add chicken and cook in oven for 20-25 minutes until chicken is cooked through. Evenly divide all ingredients among four meal prep bowls. Serve and enjoy – leftovers last in fridge up to 5 days.     The post Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls appeared first on The Girl on Bloor. These Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls with brussels sprouts, sage & wild rice are a delicious lunch or dinner idea cooked on a sheet pan and filled with fall flavours! Jump to Recipe

Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls

Ingredients in harvest bowls

Oh hi there fall lunches.

These Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls are basically my favourite season made all in one on a sheet pan. It's lunch, it's dinner – really, whatever you decide. And the trick? Lots of garlic and sage! Aka my two favourite fall flavours.

Okay, scratch that. Garlic is a favourite seasoning of mine year round. But especially during the fall months. I think it just makes everything better – when in doubt, just add more garlic! (and maybe make sure you don't have a date or important engagement immediately after…?)

FREE MEAL PREP CHALLENGE!
Subscribe for my free 5-day meal prep challenge complete with printable PDF resources!
Your name:
Your email:

Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls

How to make sheet pan chicken

I don't know if you've noticed but I've been on a real squash and sweet potato kick lately. They're basically my go-to starches when the weather gets colder, and it helps that they're in season and super cheap at the grocery store. Now I've gotta confess, but these Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls are very similar to this Sheet Pan Honey Dijon Chicken.

It's got a similar marinade AND butternut squash, but I promise these bowls are very different in the remaining seasonings. And you know that that's what makes a great recipe right? The ability to make different variations of it over time? I think the fact that it's still in my recipe rotation speaks wonders considering how many different things I end up making on a regular basis.

Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls

How to cook wild rice

Ingredient substitutions

I also included some wild rice in these bowls just to keep it all fall-like, but you could do whatever grain you're feeling. I know wild rice tends to take extra time to cook and it'll actually take longer than the veggies and chicken itself so you may want to sub in some quinoa or just add some extra butternut squash or even sweet potatoes to the sheet pan as opposed to doing the extra grain on the side.

I've actually found myself eating a lot less grains and way more veggies these days – I just get too full with too many carbs and I'm able to retain more energy throughout the day with just protein, fruits and veggies alone so you may want to follow in my footsteps and do the same here to save time.

Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls

Storing and reheating

Freezing the chicken and rice

However, if you really do want the rice, I would highly suggest buying a rice cooker! And no, I'm not going to sell you on one in particular because I haven't quite gotten that far in my research, I'm just recommending it solely on the fact that it makes a lot of my meal prep easier when I am adding grains to things.

Rice cookers can cook quinoa, couscous and other grains so all you really need to do is add the correct ratio of grains to water and the rice cooker intuitively cooks until finished. I can't tell you how many times I made rice on the stovetop only to find it sticking to the bottom or that I wasn't cooking it enough. Such a simple thing is much harder than it looks, I swear LOL. With my rice cooker I just set it and forget it, no draining, no under-doneness, nothing. Like I've said time and time again, meal prep is all about making your life easier and there's no way I'm giving myself extra clean up.

Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls

Sheet pan chicken marinade

Speaking of too little time, that's why you need to start prepping more sheet pan meals that turn into meal prep bowls for the week. Meal prep is fun because you can literally take any type of cuisine and turn it into your lunches for the week. Obviously these Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls have a fall theme and are kind of a spin in buddha bowls, but they're also great because you can use up any veggies you have on hand in the fridge, as is the case with most of my recipes.

Even if you don't have fresh sage, any combo of herbs and spices will work as long as you add salt, pepper and garlic. And my secret weapon that brightens up just about any sheet pan meal?

Lemon juice! Adding a little bit of acid in there with the other herbs and spices can brighten up a meal like no other, and it's a low-calorie way to add a tiny bit more flavour without resorting to processed sauces, etc.

More sheet pan chicken recipes

Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls

Meal prep tools for this recipe

Meal prep challenge

If you'd like some more help with meal planning, then you'll love my free 5-day meal prep challenge! It's basically a free course that will teach you how to meal prep and cook healthy meals at home with some PDF bonus materials. Sign up for free below:

FREE MEAL PREP CHALLENGE!
Subscribe for my free 5-day meal prep challenge complete with printable PDF resources!
Your name:
Your email:

 

Chicken & Butternut Squash Buddha Meal Prep Bowls

These Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls with brussels sprouts, sage & wild rice are a delicious lunch or dinner idea cooked on a sheet pan and filled with fall flavours! 

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 lb chicken breasts (diced)
  • 1/4 cup honey mustard
  • 1 cup butternut squash, diced
  • 1 cup brussels sprouts, sliced in half
  • 1 red pepper, chopped
  • 1 small red onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic minced
  • 12 fresh sage leaves, finely chopped (alternative: 1 tsp dried)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper

Wild rice

  • 1 cup wild rice
  • 1 3/4 cups water
  • 1 tsp butter
  1. Preheat oven to 450 F. Cook wild rice according to package directions on stove top or in a rice cooker (highly recommend a rice cooker so you can set it and forget it!)
  2. Toss chicken with honey mustard. Add all veggies to baking sheet, tossing with olive oil, garlic, sage and salt & pepper. Add chicken and cook in oven for 20-25 minutes until chicken is cooked through.

  3. Evenly divide all ingredients among four meal prep bowls. Serve and enjoy – leftovers last in fridge up to 5 days.

 

These Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls with brussels sprouts, sage & wild rice are a delicious lunch or dinner idea cooked on a sheet pan and filled with fall flavours! #harvestbowls #sheetpan These Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls with brussels sprouts, sage & wild rice are a delicious lunch or dinner idea cooked on a sheet pan and filled with fall flavours! #harvestbowls #sheetpan These Meal Prep Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls with brussels sprouts, sage & wild rice are a delicious lunch or dinner idea cooked on a sheet pan and filled with fall flavours! #harvestbowls #sheetpan

 

The post Chicken & Butternut Squash Harvest Bowls appeared first on The Girl on Bloor.

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Dish 18: Garlic Braised Short Ribs https://airleds.com//blogs/feed/dish-18-garlic-braised-short-ribs 2019-11-04T08:37:42Z Airleds Admin Contents Intro Prepping the Dish Cooking the Dish Overall Impressions Final Word Recipe Intro The day I’m writing this post and cooking this week’s installment of the 26 Dishes is Sunday, November 3. In the U.S., today is the annual rite of passage known as Daylight Savings, where we turn our clocks back an hour and return to Eastern Standard Time. Many people don’t like this time of year because they don’t like leaving work and having it already be dark outside.  Personally, I don’t mind “falling back” as much as other people maybe because as a morning person, I greatly enjoy waking up to more sunlight! That aside, many people view setting the clocks back as a sign of fall coming to an end or the beginning of winter altogether. While the latter season is many people’s least favorite season, it happens to be my favorite for a host of reasons, but that’s a song for another time. One of the major reasons this is the case is because of the food. Light, bright, and refreshing meals of the warm summer months are replaced by hearty dishes meant to be enjoyed around a dinner table with friends and family. Winter meals are some of my favorite because many of them call for long cooking times either on the stovetop, or in the oven at relatively low temperatures – low and slow as the phrase goes. Taking all of this into mind, this week’s recipe was one of those “fixed” dishes on my calendar that I knew needed to be made today. More than maybe any other dish on this 26-week adventure (my birthday dish included), I took the greatest care selecting the dish for today. It needed to be a welcoming one that put me in the right frame of mind for winter, one that stood in contrast to increasingly colder days and less sunlight. Enter an obvious choice for this tall task: Garlic braised short ribs. This recipe has it all: chopped (not finely chopped or minced) vegetables, with beef and herbs slow cooked in an oven for 3-4 hours finished with fresh herbs which all adds up to a dish that’s very forgiving on paper. This particular recipe comes from the NYTimes Cooking team, and specifically someone who might be our house’s favorite chef/food personality, Alison Roman. Cooking something from her automatically means Katie will definitely have some of this, so I have that going for me from the outset! Oh, as for the garlic part of this recipe, two heads (not cloves, not teaspoons, or tablespoons, but HEADS) of garlic are used, and anything with that much garlic can’t be bad, right?! Prepping the Dish Energized with an extra hour of sleep, I woke up and during the course of making oatmeal, I set to work chopping the onion, carrots, and celery, the trinity of all soups and stews. Recognizing all of these were going to add flavor and not be plated, it was easy chopping these. I knew as long as they were the same size, they’d cook evenly and at the same time – just the type of prep you want to do over breakfast. It also allowed me to use one of the new mixing bowls from a recently procured mixing bowl set. The veggie core of the sauce Great, glorious garlic The stars salted and peppered Cooking the Dish After Katie cleared the kitchen following her work-week meal prep, I grabbed my Le Creuset and got it ready to brown the seasoned short ribs. It took two batches to brown the short ribs, but it was worth not crowding the cooking area. My reward for this space was it made flipping the ribs a lot easier, but I was also left with a lot of fond, a critical component of this dish and in quantities that exceeded my expectations. First batch browning complete Batch 2. Note all the fond already present After removing the ribs, I lowered the heat a touch and deposited the heads of garlic in oil. Seeing and smelling that much garlic cooking was nothing short of an early Christmas gift to myself. The onion, carrots, and celery were added and coated with the remaining oil and fat and spent a few minutes softening before some tomato paste was added for flavor and to thicken the liquid. With the core of the dish browned and softened it was time to call Katie into the kitchen for what she’d been waiting for (no joke, she really wanted me to let her know when this was happening): the deglazing of all that fond. As she added the wine, I was quickly and easily able to scrape the bottom of the pot free of the fond, adding it to the liquid just before pouring in some beef stock and returning the ribs. Four sprigs of thyme were added to everything before the Le Creuset was tucked into the oven for its four hour nap. One very fun thing about cooking this dish was how you could smell it changing. About 90 minutes in, I wandered into the kitchen for a glass of milk and I could still smell the alcohol from the wine. With 90 minutes left, the smell was all but gone and I knew that the alcohol was now completely cooked out and the sauce was going to have an hour to come together – perfect. Overall Impressions Before pictures and narrative, I’ll come right to the point: this dish is delicious – simple as that!  Taking the lid off, I was greeted by a something that smelled sweet, rich, and hearty, and thickened noticeably. Removing the ribs from their liquid environment to a plate, I knew they were cooked perfectly, but for good measure, the meat fell off of two of the bones. Yum!! Notice how much everything reduced Naturally, I took a taste of the cooking liquid to see how that was. It was good, but quite fatty. This would be even more apparent when I strained all of this into a glass mixing bowl and could see what was at least ⅛” of fat on the surface of the dish. I anticipate being able to scoop the fat off after I refrigerate the liquid and scoop the solidified fat off the surface, but I really wish I had a fat separator so I could’ve enjoyed the sauce unhampered by the fat. Needless to say, my one and only complaint about the meal is this fat. (Note: as expected, the fat was easily removed the morning after.) The strained sauce Katie had the great idea to take a pair of ribs, shred them, and serve them with rigatoni and the sauce like a beef stroganoff. All of this was tossed together and topped with chopped chives, parsley, and lemon zest. The first bite of this immediately revealed how much those three garnishes add color, crunch and brightness to a heavy dish. They really transform this good dish into a great dish. Do not neglect these oft overlooked ingredients; they’re critical. The unsung, but unforgettable, ingredients A very good dinner The rib meat was sweet, tender, and elevated by the sauce. I’m biased, but I really think this dish benefits from being seasoned with a few cranks of the pepper mill. This has the added benefit of seasoning the dish and making the fattiness of the sauce less obvious. Speaking of that sauce, going forward, I’ll portion out a little of the sauce and add some flour to it to see if I like it thicker or how it comes out of the oven. Because of the sauce, this dish really shines by being paired with something to tackle that liquid. Serve this with a side such as a salad and or roasted potatoes, don a pair of LL Bean slippers and you’re well on the way to enjoying an exceptional dinner. Alternatively, something related to rigatoni, or a wide pasta such as tagliatelle will perform exceptionally well here too. Final Word “Whose woods these are I think I know / His house is in the village though.” These are the opening two lines of Robert Frost’s “Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening.” For me, no words better capture winter better than that poem. In my head, I wanted to make a dish today that was the culinary equivalent of that poem. A lofty goal, but the garlic braised short ribs did not disappoint and met that goal. This dish is probably one that is better left over not only because it gives flavors more time to develop, but also because it allows you a chance to more easily skim the fat off the sauce. An absolutely perfect Sunday afternoon recipe, especially one that sees daylight shrink by an hour, this dish needs to be part of your winter recipe arsenal. Don’t wait until there’s snow in the forecast to make this dish. Print it out the ingredient list, head to the grocery store, grab the ingredients and give it a try. Then when winter is in full swing, have three friends, family members, or a combination over and make this dish with the confidence of having already made it. Take advantage of the four hours of inactive cook time to catch up with your guests, watch a movie, or play a board or card game – ideally in front of a fire and preferably a wood-burning one. Then plate and serve the dish, let your heart and soul fill with the comfort of this dish, smile, and think to yourself, “maybe winter isn’t so bad after all.” Garlic Braised Short Ribs Time: 4 hours Yields: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 5 pounds bone-in short ribs, at least 1 1/2 inches thick  Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper 2 large heads garlic, halved crosswise 1 medium onion (about 10 ounces), chopped 4 ribs celery (about 8 ounces, chopped 2 medium carrots (about 6 ounces), chopped 3 tablespoons tomato paste 2 cups dry red wine (about half a bottle) 2 cups beef stock or bone broth (use beef bouillon dissolved in water if unavailable; chicken stock will work in a pinch), plus more as needed 4 sprigs thyme 1 cup parsley, coarsely chopped ½ cup finely chopped chives 1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest Directions Heat oven to 275 degrees. Heat oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Season short ribs on all sides with salt and pepper. Working in batches, sear short ribs on all sides until deeply and evenly browned, 6 to 8 minutes per batch. Transfer browned short ribs to a large plate and continue with remaining ribs. Pour off all but 2 tablespoons of remaining fat, leaving the good browned bits behind. Reduce heat to medium, and add garlic, cut side down and cook, undisturbed, until golden brown, about 1 to 2 minutes. Add onion, celery and carrots and season with salt and pepper. Toss to coat and continue to cook until vegetables are softened but not yet browned, about 5 to 10 minutes. Add tomato paste and stir to coat. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until tomato paste has started to caramelize a bit on the bottom and up the edges of the pot, about 2 to 3 minutes. Add red wine and, using a wooden spoon, scrape up any browned or caramelized bits. Let this simmer 2 to 3 minutes, just to take the edge off and reduce a bit. Stir in beef stock along with thyme. Using tongs, return short ribs to the pot, along with any juices that have accumulated, nestling them in there so that they are submerged (if they are just barely covered, nestle them bone side up so that all the meat is submerged, adding more beef stock or water as necessary to cover). Bring to a simmer, then cover and transfer to oven. Cook, undisturbed, until short ribs are meltingly tender and falling off the bone (you should be able to shred the meat with a fork), 3½ to 4 hours. Using tongs, remove the ribs from the pot, taking care (for presentation purposes, really) not to let the bone slip out and transfer them to a large plate. (While you could serve the short ribs right out of this pot, the vegetables have all given up their flavor and texture and aren’t worth much now, so feel free to strain the sauce for easier eating.) Scatter parsley, chives and lemon zest over the top of the short ribs. Separate the fat from the sauce, season with salt and pepper and serve alongside. Contents

Intro

The day I’m writing this post and cooking this week’s installment of the 26 Dishes is Sunday, November 3. In the U.S., today is the annual rite of passage known as Daylight Savings, where we turn our clocks back an hour and return to Eastern Standard Time. Many people don’t like this time of year because they don’t like leaving work and having it already be dark outside. 

Personally, I don’t mind “falling back” as much as other people maybe because as a morning person, I greatly enjoy waking up to more sunlight! That aside, many people view setting the clocks back as a sign of fall coming to an end or the beginning of winter altogether. While the latter season is many people’s least favorite season, it happens to be my favorite for a host of reasons, but that’s a song for another time.

One of the major reasons this is the case is because of the food. Light, bright, and refreshing meals of the warm summer months are replaced by hearty dishes meant to be enjoyed around a dinner table with friends and family. Winter meals are some of my favorite because many of them call for long cooking times either on the stovetop, or in the oven at relatively low temperatures – low and slow as the phrase goes.

Taking all of this into mind, this week’s recipe was one of those “fixed” dishes on my calendar that I knew needed to be made today. More than maybe any other dish on this 26-week adventure (my birthday dish included), I took the greatest care selecting the dish for today. It needed to be a welcoming one that put me in the right frame of mind for winter, one that stood in contrast to increasingly colder days and less sunlight.

Enter an obvious choice for this tall task: Garlic braised short ribs. This recipe has it all: chopped (not finely chopped or minced) vegetables, with beef and herbs slow cooked in an oven for 3-4 hours finished with fresh herbs which all adds up to a dish that’s very forgiving on paper. This particular recipe comes from the NYTimes Cooking team, and specifically someone who might be our house’s favorite chef/food personality, Alison Roman. Cooking something from her automatically means Katie will definitely have some of this, so I have that going for me from the outset! Oh, as for the garlic part of this recipe, two heads (not cloves, not teaspoons, or tablespoons, but HEADS) of garlic are used, and anything with that much garlic can’t be bad, right?!

Prepping the Dish

Energized with an extra hour of sleep, I woke up and during the course of making oatmeal, I set to work chopping the onion, carrots, and celery, the trinity of all soups and stews. Recognizing all of these were going to add flavor and not be plated, it was easy chopping these. I knew as long as they were the same size, they’d cook evenly and at the same time – just the type of prep you want to do over breakfast. It also allowed me to use one of the new mixing bowls from a recently procured mixing bowl set.

The veggie core of the sauce
Great, glorious garlic
The stars salted and peppered

Cooking the Dish

After Katie cleared the kitchen following her work-week meal prep, I grabbed my Le Creuset and got it ready to brown the seasoned short ribs. It took two batches to brown the short ribs, but it was worth not crowding the cooking area. My reward for this space was it made flipping the ribs a lot easier, but I was also left with a lot of fond, a critical component of this dish and in quantities that exceeded my expectations.

First batch browning complete
Batch 2. Note all the fond already present

After removing the ribs, I lowered the heat a touch and deposited the heads of garlic in oil. Seeing and smelling that much garlic cooking was nothing short of an early Christmas gift to myself. The onion, carrots, and celery were added and coated with the remaining oil and fat and spent a few minutes softening before some tomato paste was added for flavor and to thicken the liquid.

With the core of the dish browned and softened it was time to call Katie into the kitchen for what she’d been waiting for (no joke, she really wanted me to let her know when this was happening): the deglazing of all that fond. As she added the wine, I was quickly and easily able to scrape the bottom of the pot free of the fond, adding it to the liquid just before pouring in some beef stock and returning the ribs. Four sprigs of thyme were added to everything before the Le Creuset was tucked into the oven for its four hour nap.

One very fun thing about cooking this dish was how you could smell it changing. About 90 minutes in, I wandered into the kitchen for a glass of milk and I could still smell the alcohol from the wine. With 90 minutes left, the smell was all but gone and I knew that the alcohol was now completely cooked out and the sauce was going to have an hour to come together – perfect.

Overall Impressions

Before pictures and narrative, I’ll come right to the point: this dish is delicious – simple as that! 

Taking the lid off, I was greeted by a something that smelled sweet, rich, and hearty, and thickened noticeably. Removing the ribs from their liquid environment to a plate, I knew they were cooked perfectly, but for good measure, the meat fell off of two of the bones.

Yum!! Notice how much everything reduced

Naturally, I took a taste of the cooking liquid to see how that was. It was good, but quite fatty. This would be even more apparent when I strained all of this into a glass mixing bowl and could see what was at least ⅛” of fat on the surface of the dish. I anticipate being able to scoop the fat off after I refrigerate the liquid and scoop the solidified fat off the surface, but I really wish I had a fat separator so I could’ve enjoyed the sauce unhampered by the fat. Needless to say, my one and only complaint about the meal is this fat. (Note: as expected, the fat was easily removed the morning after.)

The strained sauce

Katie had the great idea to take a pair of ribs, shred them, and serve them with rigatoni and the sauce like a beef stroganoff. All of this was tossed together and topped with chopped chives, parsley, and lemon zest. The first bite of this immediately revealed how much those three garnishes add color, crunch and brightness to a heavy dish. They really transform this good dish into a great dish. Do not neglect these oft overlooked ingredients; they’re critical.

The unsung, but unforgettable, ingredients
A very good dinner

The rib meat was sweet, tender, and elevated by the sauce. I’m biased, but I really think this dish benefits from being seasoned with a few cranks of the pepper mill. This has the added benefit of seasoning the dish and making the fattiness of the sauce less obvious. Speaking of that sauce, going forward, I’ll portion out a little of the sauce and add some flour to it to see if I like it thicker or how it comes out of the oven.

Because of the sauce, this dish really shines by being paired with something to tackle that liquid. Serve this with a side such as a salad and or roasted potatoes, don a pair of LL Bean slippers and you’re well on the way to enjoying an exceptional dinner. Alternatively, something related to rigatoni, or a wide pasta such as tagliatelle will perform exceptionally well here too.

Final Word

“Whose woods these are I think I know / His house is in the village though.” These are the opening two lines of Robert Frost’s “Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening.” For me, no words better capture winter better than that poem. In my head, I wanted to make a dish today that was the culinary equivalent of that poem. A lofty goal, but the garlic braised short ribs did not disappoint and met that goal. This dish is probably one that is better left over not only because it gives flavors more time to develop, but also because it allows you a chance to more easily skim the fat off the sauce.

An absolutely perfect Sunday afternoon recipe, especially one that sees daylight shrink by an hour, this dish needs to be part of your winter recipe arsenal. Don’t wait until there’s snow in the forecast to make this dish. Print it out the ingredient list, head to the grocery store, grab the ingredients and give it a try. Then when winter is in full swing, have three friends, family members, or a combination over and make this dish with the confidence of having already made it.

Take advantage of the four hours of inactive cook time to catch up with your guests, watch a movie, or play a board or card game – ideally in front of a fire and preferably a wood-burning one. Then plate and serve the dish, let your heart and soul fill with the comfort of this dish, smile, and think to yourself, “maybe winter isn’t so bad after all.”


Garlic Braised Short Ribs

Time: 4 hours Yields: 4-6

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 5 pounds bone-in short ribs, at least 1 1/2 inches thick
  •  Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 large heads garlic, halved crosswise
  • 1 medium onion (about 10 ounces), chopped
  • 4 ribs celery (about 8 ounces, chopped
  • 2 medium carrots (about 6 ounces), chopped
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 cups dry red wine (about half a bottle)
  • 2 cups beef stock or bone broth (use beef bouillon dissolved in water if unavailable; chicken stock will work in a pinch), plus more as needed
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • 1 cup parsley, coarsely chopped
  • ½ cup finely chopped chives
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 275 degrees. Heat oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Season short ribs on all sides with salt and pepper. Working in batches, sear short ribs on all sides until deeply and evenly browned, 6 to 8 minutes per batch. Transfer browned short ribs to a large plate and continue with remaining ribs.
  2. Pour off all but 2 tablespoons of remaining fat, leaving the good browned bits behind. Reduce heat to medium, and add garlic, cut side down and cook, undisturbed, until golden brown, about 1 to 2 minutes. Add onion, celery and carrots and season with salt and pepper. Toss to coat and continue to cook until vegetables are softened but not yet browned, about 5 to 10 minutes. Add tomato paste and stir to coat. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until tomato paste has started to caramelize a bit on the bottom and up the edges of the pot, about 2 to 3 minutes.
  3. Add red wine and, using a wooden spoon, scrape up any browned or caramelized bits. Let this simmer 2 to 3 minutes, just to take the edge off and reduce a bit. Stir in beef stock along with thyme. Using tongs, return short ribs to the pot, along with any juices that have accumulated, nestling them in there so that they are submerged (if they are just barely covered, nestle them bone side up so that all the meat is submerged, adding more beef stock or water as necessary to cover). Bring to a simmer, then cover and transfer to oven.
  4. Cook, undisturbed, until short ribs are meltingly tender and falling off the bone (you should be able to shred the meat with a fork), 3½ to 4 hours.
  5. Using tongs, remove the ribs from the pot, taking care (for presentation purposes, really) not to let the bone slip out and transfer them to a large plate. (While you could serve the short ribs right out of this pot, the vegetables have all given up their flavor and texture and aren’t worth much now, so feel free to strain the sauce for easier eating.) Scatter parsley, chives and lemon zest over the top of the short ribs. Separate the fat from the sauce, season with salt and pepper and serve alongside.
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